Advising

 

Your Adviser

Advising is essential to your success as a student at Marquette. It is mandatory for all students in the University to meet with your adviser at least once per semester during Advising Week and you are encouraged to set up an appointment or visit during office hours whenever you have a question throughout the semester. Not sure who your adviser is? Log in to Checkmarq, go to your "Student Center" page and you will see your adviser’s name in a box on the right side of the screen.

There are many programs with varying requirements and you will have more choices to make than you ever had previously. Your adviser is an important resource you should consult as you navigate your path to graduation. Even if you think you fully understand the requirements and have set your schedule, always check in with your adviser.

How to Register for Classes

The Office of the Registrar provides extensive online information on class registration topics including what to do before you register, what to do while you register, and how to get additional help if you need it. These topics can be found on the Marquette Central Course Registration page.

The most important information on how to register through CheckMarq can be found on the Marquette Central webpage.

If you still have concerns, call our college Records Office at (414) 288-7702.

How to Prepare for Advising

Your adviser is there to help; however, you can make the most of your advising session if you come prepared. Think ahead about what courses you want to take and bring your questions about majors/minors, internships, study abroad programs, career opportunities, etc. The Graduation Checklist is an electronic resource that you should print and bring to your advising session (or else an electronic device that allows you to access it) so you see what requirements you have already met and which ones are still unfulfilled. To access the Graduation Checklist and learn how to track your degree progress, visit the Academic Advisement tool. To get more tips on what to expect from your advising session, visit the "Academic Advising" section of the Marquette Bulletin.

Majors and Minors in Communication

The Undergraduate Bulletin provides a list of requirements for each major and minor within the university. Here's an easy way to find the requirements for all the majors and minors in the Diederich College.

Remember that all students in the College must have a major plus a minor or a second major. The minor or second major can be another area within communication or it can be from another college within the university. Some restrictions may apply when combining double majors and minors, so check with your adviser or with the college Records Office for clarification.

Typical First Semester Schedule for Freshmen by Major

Below is a typical first semester schedule for Freshmen with a breakdown of courses by major. Students who have not decided on a major should follow the Communication Studies curriculum. You may also download the first semester schedules through this Word document.

Advertising (16 credits)

  • COMM 1000, lecture plus discussion section or COMM 1200, lecture plus a discussion section
  • COMM 1050
  • ENGL 1001. Honors students take ENGL 1301 instead; ESL students take sections reserved for them; and students with AP credit for ENGL 1001 take COMM 1100, if available.
  • THEO 1001. Honors students take 1001H.
  • Choose two additional 3-credit courses from ADVE 1400, history, foreign language, diverse cultures, science, MATH 1700, or elective.

Communication Studies (16 credits)

  • COMM 1000, lecture plus discussion section or COMM 1200, lecture plus a discussion section
  • COMM 1050
  • ENGL 1001. Honors students take ENGL 1301 instead; ESL students take sections reserved for them; and students with AP credit for ENGL 1001 take COMM 1100, if available.
  • THEO 1001. Honors students take 1001H.
  • Choose two additional 3-credit courses from history, foreign language, diverse cultures, science, math, or elective.

Corporate Communication (16 credits)

  • COMM 1000, lecture plus discussion section or COMM 1200, lecture plus a discussion section
  • COMM 1050
  • ENGL 1001. Honors students take ENGL 1301 instead; ESL students take sections reserved for them; and students with AP credit for ENGL 1001 take COMM 1100, if available.
  • THEO 1001. Honors students take 1001H.
  • Choose two additional 3-credit courses from CCOM 2000, history, foreign language, diverse cultures, science, MATH 1700, or elective.

Digital Media (16 credits)

  • COMM 1000, lecture plus discussion section or COMM 1200, lecture plus a discussion section
  • COMM 1050
  • ENGL 1001. Honors students take ENGL 1301 instead; ESL students take sections reserved for them; and students with AP credit for ENGL 1001 take COMM 1100, if available.
  • THEO 1001. Honors students take 1001H.
  • Choose two additional 3-credit courses from DGMD 2335, history, foreign language, diverse cultures, science, MATH 1700, , PSYC 1001, or elective.

Journalism (15 -17 credits)

  • COMM 1000, lecture plus discussion section or COMM 1200, lecture plus a discussion section
  • COMM 1050
  • ENGL 1001. Honors students take ENGL 1301 instead; ESL students take sections reserved for them; and students with AP credit for ENGL 1001 take COMM 1100, if available.
  • THEO 1001. Honors students take 1001H.
  • JOUR 1001
  • Choose one additional 3-credit courses from history, foreign language, diverse cultures, science, MATH 1700, or elective or JOUR 1050 (2 credits)

Media Studies (16 credits)

  • COMM 1000, lecture plus discussion section or COMM 1200, lecture plus a discussion section
  • COMM 1050
  • ENGL 1001. Honors students take ENGL 1301 instead; ESL students take sections reserved for them; and students with AP credit for ENGL 1001 take COMM 1100, if available.
  • THEO 1001. Honors students take 1001H.
  • Choose two additional 3-credit courses from history, foreign language, diverse cultures, science, math, or elective.

Public Relations (16 credits)

  • COMM 1000, lecture plus discussion section or COMM 1200, lecture plus a discussion section
  • COMM 1050
  • ENGL 1001. Honors students take ENGL 1301 instead; ESL students take sections reserved for them; and students with AP credit for ENGL 1001 take COMM 1100, if available.
  • THEO 1001. Honors students take 1001H.
  • Choose two additional 3-credit courses from PURE 1800, history, foreign language, diverse cultures, math, science, or elective.

Theatre Arts (16.5 credits)

  • COMM 1000, lecture plus discussion section or COMM 1200, lecture plus a discussion section
  • COMM 1050
  • ENGL 1001. Honors students take ENGL 1301 instead; ESL students take sections reserved for them; and students with AP credit for ENGL 1001 take COMM 1100, if available.
  • THAR 1100
  • THAR 1300, section 101 and choose one section of THAR 1310 from 101-104 or THAR 1320, section 101 and choose one section of THAR 1330 from 101-104
  • Choose one additional 3-credit courses from history, foreign language, diverse cultures, science, or math.

Undecided (16 credits)

  • COMM 1000, lecture plus discussion section or COMM 1200, lecture plus a discussion section
  • COMM 1050
  • ENGL 1001. Honors students take ENGL 1301 instead; ESL students take sections reserved for them; and students with AP credit for ENGL 1001 take COMM 1100, if available.
  • THEO 1001. Honors students take 1001H.
  • Choose two additional 3-credit courses from history, foreign language, diverse cultures, science, math, or elective.

More Regarding the University Core of Common Studies

(See a complete list of Marquette's "University Core of Common Studies" or "UCCS" courses.)

Dual Application Courses: Several courses have been approved for dual application within the UCCS. Any course used for a UCCS requirement cannot also be used to fulfill a college core or curriculum requirement unless specifically approved (COMM 1100 and 1200). UCCS courses can also be used towards major, minor and cognate requirements.

UCCS Individual and Social Behavior requirement is met by COMM 1200. There is no need to take another ISB course unless it is required as a support course, is a course in your minor, or simply looks like an interesting elective.

UCCS Diverse Cultures lower division courses included ANTH 1001 Intro to Anthropology; EDUC 1210 Intro to Schooling in Diverse Society; HEAL 1025 Culture and Health; INPS 2010 Intro to Peace Studies; SOWJ 2150 Immigrants and their Communities; HIST 1301 Latin America; HIST 1401 Africa and HIST 1501 East Asia. Remember that these three history classes are dual application courses and can also be used to fulfill the UCCS History of Cultures and Societies requirement. THEO 3420 Bridging the Racial Divide is also a dual application course that fulfills a diverse cultures requirement and the 2nd level UCCS Theology requirement. If you are an ADVE or PURE major, you may want to wait and take ADPR 4600 (International Advertising and Public Relations) because it counts as a diverse cultures class plus is an elective in the major.

Credit Loads

Students in the Diederich College are required to complete a minimum of 120 credit hours with a 2.0 GPA in order to graduate. This means that a student taking an average of 15 credits for each of the 8 semesters will have the right number of credit hours required.

Taking less than 15 credit hours in any of eight semesters (fall and spring semesters for four years) leaves a student short of the required number of credits. Some students take a few 16–18 credit semesters to make up the difference, whereas others take some summer courses in order to graduate in four years. Full-time students can register for 12-19 credits, but taking only 12 credits during a semester will slow your progress toward completing the 120 credit hours required to graduate.

Students wanting to take an overload (more than 19 credits) must complete an overload request form to our College Records Office (JH 112). Since full time is 12 or more credits, dropping below 12 credits could negatively influence financial aid, health insurance and progression within the academic program.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Q: I earned some AP and IB credits, so how do I find out if I am exempt from taking a class or if I can take the course at a higher level?
  • A: You should have been notified if you received AP or IB credits, but if in doubt, contact the Records Office in JH 112 for clarification.
  • Q: When I tried to register for one of my courses, I found out it was full. What should I do?
  • A: This will happen to all students on occasion, and although it is frustrating, you will survive. In most cases, you can simply put off taking the course for a semester and take something else that you need to satisfy your major, minor, college core, or university core requirements. If delaying the course potentially delays your graduation, contact an administrator in the college that offers the course to see if you could be added. For example, if you are trying to register for Intro to Marketing and the class is full, contact the Assistant Dean or Associate Dean in the College of Business.
  • Q: Should I stay in a class and risk a bad grade or drop the course? I'm worried that a "W" on my transcript will look bad to a potential employer, but an "F" will look worse.
  • A: If you have a grade below a "C" at midterm, talk to the instructor and find out what you can do to raise your grade. If after taking any steps possible to raise your grade, you still think you are risking a "D" or "F" in the class or the class is taking so much of your time that it is pulling your grades down in other courses, drop the class. If you can get a "C" or above, stay in the class so you don't lose the credits. An occasional "W" on your transcript won't matter, but don't get in the habit of dropping courses or you will delay your progress toward graduation. If dropping a class puts you below 12 credits and changes your status to part-timer, call MU Central for guidance.
  • Q: How do I drop a course I am currently enrolled in and add a different class?
  • A: During the first week of classes, you can log onto CheckMarq and drop or add a class yourself. You can also exchange one class for another using the “swap” feature on CheckMarq. Any class you drop during this time will not show up on your transcript; however, after the first week of classes, you will no longer be able to drop the class yourself. You will need to fill out the form for withdrawal from a single course and turn in the completed form to the College Records Office in JH 112. Your transcript will show a grade of “W” for the course.
  • Q: How do I declare or change my major/minor?
  • A: To declare or change a communication major, complete a form available in the Records Office, JH 112. It is also available on the college website under “Forms” in the Current Students section. Non-Communication majors can also use this form to declare one of the areas of Communication as a second major. However, students declaring a second major outside of the College of Communication fill out a form available through the college that offers the major. To declare any minor within MU, fill out the minor declaration form through the MU Central/Office of the Registrar website.
  • Q: What if the information on my Academic Advisement page isn't up to date?
  • A: If you find inaccurate information on the Academic Requirements page (e.g., a course you transferred from another institution has not been credited), please inform the college Records Office in JH 112. Any changes in your major, minor or adviser must be initiated through the Records Office.

Contacts

College Records Office

For questions during the summer, call our college Records Office at (414) 288-7702 

Administrators

  • Associate Dean, College of Communication: Dr. Joyce Wolburg, (414) 288-7309
  • Director of Student Records and Academic Advising: Sue Clinton, (414) 288-7075
  • Director of Student Success: David Denomie, (414) 288-3498

Department Chairs

  • Communication Studies, Dr. Scott D'Urso, (414) 288-5477
  • Digital Media and Performing Arts, Stephen Hudson-Mairet, (414) 288-3391
  • Journalism and Media Studies, Dr. Ana Garner, (414) 288-7383
  • Strategic Communication (Advertising, Public Relations and Corporate Communication), Dr. Jean Grow, (414) 288-6357

Other Campus Resources

  • Career Services Center: (414) 288-7428
  • Counseling Center: (414) 288-7172
  • Information Technology Helpdesk: (414) 288-7799
  • Office of Disability Services: (414) 288-1645
  • Office of Student Educational Services: (414) 288-3270
  • Parking Services: (414) 288-6911
  • Public Safety: (414) 288-6800
  • Residence Life: (414) 288-7208
  • Student Employment Service: (414) 288-4000
  • Student Health Service: (414) 288-7184